Plain Auth Configuration

Introduction

To configure a plain LDAP authentication provider, navigate to the providers array inside of your config/auth.php file, and paste the following users provider:

You will have to remove the default included users provider.

// config/auth.php

'providers' => [
    // ...

    'users' => [
        'driver' => 'ldap',
        'model' => LdapRecord\Models\ActiveDirectory\User::class,
        'rules' => [],
    ],
],

Important: If your application requires more than one LDAP connection, you must create a new provider for each connection.

This new provider must have its own unique model class which must use your alternate configured connection name using the $connection property.

In the scenario of having multiple LDAP connections, it may be helpful to namespace the LDAP models you create with the desired connection. For example:

App\Ldap\DomainAlpha\User

This will allow you to segregate scopes, rules and other classes to their relating connection.

Driver

The driver option must be ldap as this is what indicates to Laravel the proper authentication driver to use.

Model

The model option must be the class name of your LdapRecord model. This model will be used for fetching users from your directory.

Rules

The rules option must be an array of authentication rule class names.

Overview

LDAP authentication rules give you the ability to allow or deny users from signing into your application using a condition you would like to apply. These rules are executed after a user successfully passes LDAP authentication against your configured server.

Think of them as a final authorization gate before they are allowed in.

Authentication rules are never executed if a user fails LDAP authentication.

Creating Rules

Let's create an LDAP rule that only allows members of our domain Administrators group.

To create an authentication rule, call the make:ldap-rule command:

php artisan make:ldap-rule OnlyAdministrators

A rule will then be created in your applications app/Ldap/Rules directory:

<?php

namespace App\Ldap\Rules;

use LdapRecord\Laravel\Auth\Rule;

class OnlyAdministrators extends Rule
{
    /**
     * Check if the rule passes validation.
     *
     * @return bool
     */
    public function isValid()
    {
        //
    }
}

In the authentication rule, a $user property will be made available to us.

Now, we will update the isValid method to check the LDAP users groups relationship to see if they are a member:

<?php

namespace App\Ldap\Rules;

use LdapRecord\Laravel\Auth\Rule;
use LdapRecord\Models\ActiveDirectory\Group;

class OnlyAdministrators extends Rule
{
    public function isValid()
    {
        $administrators = Group::find('cn=Administrators,dc=local,dc=com');

        return $this->user->groups()->recursive()->exists($administrators);
    }
}

We call the recursive method on the relationship to make sure that we load groups of groups in case the user is not an immediate member of the Administrators group.

Once we have our rule defined, we will add it into our authentication provider in the config/auth.php file:

'providers' => [
    // ...

    'ldap' => [
        'driver' => 'ldap',
        'model' => LdapRecord\Models\ActiveDirectory\User::class,
        'rules' => [
            App\Ldap\Rules\OnlyAdministrators::class,
        ],
    ],
],

Now when you attempt to login to your application with a LDAP user that successfully passes LDAP authentication, they will need to be a member of the Administrators group.

If you are caching your configuration, make sure you re-run config:cache to re-cache your modifications.

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