Authentication Quickstart

Introduction

Please complete the LdapRecord-Laravel quickstart guide to install LdapRecord and configure your LDAP connection prior to setting up authentication.

Before you begin, this guide assumes you have published Laravel's authentication scaffolding using the laravel/jetstream package.

If you haven't done this yet, please follow Laravel Jetstream's scaffolding guide to get started, then head back here once done.

Debugging

Inside of your config/ldap.php file, ensure you have logging enabled during the setup of authentication. Doing this will help you immensely in debugging connectivity and authentication issues.

If you encounter issues along the way, be sure to open your storage/logs directory after you attempt signing in to your application and see what issues may be occurring.

In addition, you may also run the below artisan command to test connectivity to each of your configured LDAP servers:

php artisan ldap:test

Plain LDAP Authentication

Step 1 - Configure the Authentication Driver

Inside of your config/auth.php file, we must add a new provider in the providers array.

In this example, we will create a provider named ldap:

config
auth.php
// config/auth.php

'providers' => [
    // ...

    'ldap' => [
        'driver' => 'ldap',
        'model' => LdapRecord\Models\ActiveDirectory\User::class,
    ],

// ...

If you are using OpenLDAP, you must switch the providers model option to:

LdapRecord\Models\OpenLDAP\User::class

Once you have setup your ldap provider, you must update the provider value in the web guard:

// config/auth.php

'guards' => [
    'web' => [
        'driver' => 'session',
        'provider' => 'ldap', // Changed to 'ldap'
    ],

// ...

Step 2 - Setting up Laravel Fortify

Authentication Callback

Laravel Jetstream uses Laravel Fortify for authentication. We will configure its various features to support signing in with LdapRecord.

To support LDAP authentication, we must call the Fortify::authenticateUsing() and supply our own callback, overriding Laravel Fortify's default:

We will call the above in our AuthServiceProvider.php file, inside the boot() method:

app
Providers
AuthServiceProvider.php
// app/Providers/AuthServiceProvider.php

// ...
use Laravel\Fortify\Fortify;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Auth;

class AuthServiceProvider extends ServiceProvider
{
    // ...

    public function boot()
    {
        $this->registerPolicies();

        Fortify::authenticateUsing(function ($request) {
            $validated = Auth::validate([
                'mail' => $request->email,
                'password' => $request->password
            ]);

            return $validated ? Auth::getLastAttempted() : null;
        });
    }
}

As you can see above in the Fortify::authenticateUsing() callback, we are passing an array of the users credentials to the Auth::validate() method. Most notibly, we set the mail key in this credentials array which is passed to the LdapRecord authentication provider.

Upon a user attempting to sign in, a search query will be executed on your directory for a user that contains the mail attribute equal to the entered email that the user has submitted on your login form. The password key will not be used in the search.

If a user cannot be located in your directory, or they fail authentication, they will be redirected to the login page normally with the "Invalid credentials" error message.

You may also add extra key => value pairs in the credentials array to further scope the LDAP query. The password key is automatically ignored by LdapRecord.

Feature Configuration

When using plain LDAP authentication, we must disable various Jetstream and Fortify features, such as teams, two-factor authentication, profile photos, API, registration, updating profile information, and resetting / updating passwords. We will make these changes in the config/jetstream.php and config/fority.php configuration files respectively:

config
fortify.php
jetstream.php
// config/fortify.php

// Before:
'features' => [
    Features::registration(),
    Features::resetPasswords(),
    // Features::emailVerification(),
    Features::updateProfileInformation(),
    Features::updatePasswords(),
    Features::twoFactorAuthentication([
        'confirmPassword' => true,
    ]),
],

// After:
'features' => [
    // Features::registration(),
    // Features::resetPasswords(),
    // Features::emailVerification(),
    // Features::updateProfileInformation(),
    // Features::updatePasswords(),
    // Features::twoFactorAuthentication([
    //     'confirmPassword' => true,
    // ]),
],
// config/jetstream.php

// Before:
'features' => [
    Features::profilePhotos(),
    Features::api(),
    Features::teams(),
],

// After:
'features' => [
    // Features::profilePhotos(),
    // Features::api(),
    // Features::teams(),
],

These features must be disabled since we cannot persist profile data, two-factor authentication codes, and more, into the users LDAP object.

Step 3 - Modifying Blade Views

When we use plain LDAP authentication, an instance of the LdapRecord model you have configured for authentication will be returned when calling the Auth::user() method. This means that our currently published blade views will immediately throw an exception due to calls such as: Auth::user()->name. Most notably, the views/navigation-dropdown.php file, if you are using the Livewire stack.

You must change the syntax to the following wherever it is found:

<!-- From... -->
{{ Auth::user()->name }}

<!-- To... -->
{{ Auth::user()->getFirstAttribute('cn') }}

You will have to remove other calls completely, such as:

{{ Auth::user()->profile_photo_url }}

These calls directly rely on Laravel's scaffolded database columns.

Once you've made the necessary modifications shown above, your application is now ready to authenticate LDAP users.

Synchronized Database Authentication

Step 1 - Publish the Migration

LdapRecord requires you to have two additional user database columns.

Column Reason
guid This is for storing your LDAP users objectguid. It is needed for locating and synchronizing your LDAP user to the database.
domain This is for storing your LDAP users connection name. It is needed for storing your configured LDAP connection name of the user.

Go ahead and publish the migration using the below command:

php artisan vendor:publish --provider="LdapRecord\Laravel\LdapAuthServiceProvider"

Then, run the migrations with the artisan migrate command:

php artisan migrate

Step 2 - Configure the Authentication Driver

Inside of your config/auth.php file, we must add a new provider in the providers array.

In this example, we will create a provider named ldap:

// config/auth.php

'providers' => [
    // ...

    'ldap' => [
        'driver' => 'ldap',
        'model' => LdapRecord\Models\ActiveDirectory\User::class,
        'database' => [
            'model' => App\Models\User::class,
            'sync_passwords' => false,
            'sync_attributes' => [
                'name' => 'cn',
                'email' => 'mail',
            ],
        ],
    ],
],

If you are using OpenLDAP, you must switch the providers model option to:

LdapRecord\Models\OpenLDAP\User::class

If you are using a different LDAP type, you will need to define your own LDAP model and insert it there. This model is used for locating the authenticating user in your LDAP directory.

Once you have setup your ldap provider, you must update the provider value in the web guard:

// config/auth.php

'guards' => [
    'web' => [
        'driver' => 'session',
        'provider' => 'ldap', // Changed to 'ldap'
    ],

    // ...

Step 3 - Setting up your database user model

Now, we must add the following trait and interface to our User Eloquent model:

Type Name
Interface LdapRecord\Laravel\Auth\LdapAuthenticatable
Trait LdapRecord\Laravel\Auth\AuthenticatesWithLdap
// app/Models/User.php

// ...
use LdapRecord\Laravel\Auth\LdapAuthenticatable;
use LdapRecord\Laravel\Auth\AuthenticatesWithLdap;

class User extends Authenticatable implements LdapAuthenticatable
{
    use AuthenticatesWithLdap;

    // ...
}

These are required so LdapRecord can set and retrieve your users domain and guid database columns.

If you would like to override the database column names that are used, you can override the following methods:

Methods
User::getLdapDomainColumn()
User::getLdapGuidColumn()

Step 4 - Setting up Laravel Fortify:

Authentication Callback & Password Confirmation

Laravel Jetstream uses Laravel Fortify for authentication. We will configure its various features to support signing in with LdapRecord.

To support LDAP authentication, we must call the following two methods and supply our own callbacks, overriding Laravel Fortify's default:

  • Fortify::authenticateUsing()
  • Fortify::confirmPasswordsUsing()

We will call the above in our AuthServiceProvider.php file, inside the boot() method:

app
Providers
AuthServiceProvider.php
// app/Providers/AuthServiceProvider.php

// ...
use App\Models\User;
use Laravel\Fortify\Fortify;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Auth;

class AuthServiceProvider extends ServiceProvider
{
    // ...

    public function boot()
    {
        $this->registerPolicies();

        Fortify::authenticateUsing(function ($request) {
            $validated = Auth::validate([
                'mail' => $request->email,
                'password' => $request->password
            ]);

            return $validated ? Auth::getLastAttempted() : null;
        });

        Fortify::confirmPasswordsUsing(function (User $user, $password) {
            return Auth::validate([
                'mail' => $user->email,
                'password' => $password,
            ]);
        });
    }
}

As you can see above, we are passing an array of the users credentials to the Auth::validate() method. Most notibly, we set the mail key in this credentials array which is passed to the LdapRecord authentication provider.

Upon a user attempting to sign in, a search query will be executed on your directory for a user that contains the mail attribute equal to the entered email that the user has submitted on your login form. The password key will not be used in the search.

If a user cannot be located in your directory, or they fail authentication, they will be redirected to the login page normally with the "Invalid credentials" error message.

You may also add extra key => value pairs in the credentials array to further scope the LDAP query. The password key is automatically ignored by LdapRecord.

Feature Configuration

Since we are synchronizing data from our LDAP server, we must disable several features by commenting them out inside of the config/fortify.php file:

// config/fortify.php

// Before:
'features' => [
    Features::registration(),
    Features::resetPasswords(),
    // Features::emailVerification(),
    Features::updateProfileInformation(),
    Features::updatePasswords(),
    Features::twoFactorAuthentication([
        'confirmPassword' => true,
    ]),
],

// After:
'features' => [
    // Features::registration(),
    // Features::resetPasswords(),
    // Features::emailVerification(),
    // Features::updateProfileInformation(),
    // Features::updatePasswords(),
    Features::twoFactorAuthentication([
        'confirmPassword' => true,
    ]),
],

Important: You may keep Features::registration() enabled if you would like to continue accepting local application user registration. Keep in mind, if you continue to allow registration, you will need to either use multiple Laravel authentication guards, or setup the login fallback feature.

Your application is now ready to authenticate LDAP users.

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